Yes, the road.

Yes, the road.
Eagle Nest, New Mexico. “People like to drive because driving is actually and symbolically an almost perfect mechanism for escape…there is probably no human being who does not have troubles, real or imagined, from which he at times feels the need to flee.” George R. Stewart.

PHB

My photo
Brooklin, Maine, United States
We own a 1975 GMC Sierra Grande 15 in Maine and a 1986 Chevrolet Custom Deluxe 10 in West Texas. Also a pair of 1997 Volvo 850 wagons. Average age in the fleet is 28 years--we're recycling. I've published 3 novels: THE LAW OF DREAMS (2006), THE O'BRIENS (2012), and CARRY ME (2016). Also 2 short story collections: NIGHT DRIVING(1987) and TRAVELLING LIGHT (2013). More of my literary life is at www.peterbehrens.org I was a Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study for 2012-13. I'm an adjunct professor at Colorado College and in the MFA program at Queens University of Charlotte. In 2015-16 I was a Fellow at Harvard University's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The Autoliterate office is in Car Talk Plaza in Harvard Square, 2 floors above Dewey Cheatem & Howe. SUBSCRIBE TO THE AUTOLITERATE DAILY EMAIL by hitting the button to the right.

Friday, February 19, 2016

The Built World, Cambridge MA

It's not all clapboard. Above is Graduate School of Art & Design, Harvard. As Brutalist goes, it's not that brutal. Kind of an appealing building though I alway think that the architects of concrete behemoths, so dazzled by the potential of the material, never sensed from their scale-modeling that the actual concrete itself would radiate drabness and grimness. This building has more élan than most of its era. Still it is so huge that I could only capture it corner by corner with the camera.
 This is part of the theatre/ Rindge Latin School complex  just down the block. RLS is the public high school in Cambridge.
 Not a great photograph since what I wanted you to see was the building, but my biophilia got away with me and you are getting the tree instead. The building is Cambridge Public Library, a lovely lighthearted neo-modernist building, hugely popular and welcoming--as a building and as an institution.
And then, up the street, that stained glass window in Memorial Hall, Harvard. The building is a memorial to Harvard men killed in the Civil War.
 And finally, back down Cambridge Street to a row of New England-vernacular three-deckahs.

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